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bioplastics daily news
  • Irish companies come together in Plastic Action Alliance for sustainable packaging

    18.04.2019

    Eleven of Ireland’s leading agricultural processing and food businesses have come together to make the plastic packaging in their respective supply chains more sustainable. The collaboration includes market leaders from Ireland’s beef, poultry, lamb, fruit, vegetables, dairy, prepared meals and packed salad sectors.

    a

    Aidan Cotter, the former CEO of Bord Bia, will be Chair of the project.

    The companies, which represent significant but different elements of the Agri. food sector are: ABP (beef); Manor Farm (poultry); Irish Country Meats (lamb); Keelings (fruit), Monaghan Mushrooms (mushrooms), Country Crest (vegetables), Ballymaguire (prepared meals), Nature’s Best (salads), Aurivo (dairy), Bandon Vale (cheese) and C&D Foods (pet food).


    The project will be driven by a steering committee which is made up of senior executives from each of the participating companies.

    All participants will use their collective food production experience and expertise to significantly reduce problematic single-use packaging from the supply chain, whilst also introducing innovative and more sustainable alternatives. The group will also work with leading researchers in the area of plastics and packaging and leverage their extensive international networks to ensure successful outcomes.

    Commenting on the launch of the collaborative programme, Aidan Cotter, said: “The coming together of eleven of the leading key players in Irish food production to look to arrive at solutions for the issue of plastics packaging is a significant development. These companies are leaders in their respective sectors and their combined experience will create a dynamic force that will likely punch well above its weight in seeking tangible solutions for the significant reduction of the use of plastic packaging on Ireland’s supermarket shelves”.

    https://www.monaghan-mushrooms.com

  • Microbes can thrive on a diet of electricity and even produce bioplastic

    17.04.2019

    Researchers in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis have figured out how to feed electricity to microbes to grow truly green, biodegradable plastic, as reported in the Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology.

    x“As our planet grapples with rampant, petroleum-based plastic use and plastic waste, finding sustainable ways to make bioplastics is becoming more and more important. We have to find new solutions,” said Arpita Bose, assistant professor of biology in Arts & Sciences.

    One of the main issues with renewable electricity is energy storage: how to collect power generated during the sunny and windy hours and hold it for when it is dark and still. Bioplastics are a good use for that “extra” power from intermittent sources, Bose suggests — as an alternative to battery storage, and instead of using that energy to make a different type of fuel.

    Her laboratory is among the first to use microbial electrosynthesis to coax a polymer called polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from electricity-eating microbes. The plastic they are making is “sustainable, carbon-neutral and low-cost,” Bose said.

    b
    The light areas in this cell are a polymer called polyhydroxybutyrate, which was grown by TIE-1 cells using only light, carbon dioxide and soluble iron. (Image: Bose laboratory)

    “One of the major challenges in bioplastic production is the substrate input, which affects cost,” said Tahina Ranaivoarisoa, a research technician in the Bose laboratory and first author of the new paper. “A versatile bacterium such as R. palustris TIE-1 — which can effectively use just carbon dioxide, light and electrons from electricity or iron for bioplastic production — broadens the substrates that could be used in bioplastic production.”

    In a related paper in the journal Bioelectrochemistry, Bose’s research team illustrated how TIE-1 interacts with various forms of iron while also using electricity as a source of electrons. The researchers were able to improve production rates for PHB by manually coating electrodes that the microbes used with a special kind of rust, which increased their electricity uptake.

    Bose believes that microbially derived bioplastics have a future role to play in space, where astronauts could use 3-D printer technology to manufacture their own tools instead of transporting everything ready-made from Earth.

    “Our observations open new doors for sustainable bioplastic production not only in resource-limited environments on Earth, but also during space exploration and for in situ resource utilization on other planets,” Bose said.

    https://is.gd/4dpo4a

    Image: Assistant professor Arpita Bose, Washington University in St. Louis

  • Dow and BioLogiQ examine options for sustainable plastic development

    16.04.2019

    Dow and BioLogiQ are collaborating to evaluate potential synergies between BioLogiQ’s novel NuPlastiQ BioPolymer, a thermoplastic plant-based resin, and Dow’s industry-leading polyethylene resin portfolio, in an effort to explore enhanced sustainable plastic options.

    aDow and BioLogiQ will work together to test and consider potential applications that incorporate bio- based resins with polyethylene, in the hopes of enabling more plant-based plastic products. BioLogiQ, a seven-year-old startup based in Idaho Falls, Idaho that’s committed to creating plastics from renewable resources, will utilize Dow’s industry-leading research and development, as well as the company’s extensive plastic resin sales and distribution network, to determine if they can successfully leverage plant-based plastics.

    “As a science-driven company, Dow is excited by the technical and environmental advantages that could be achieved by combining NuPlastiQ with Dow’s industry-leading polyethylene,” stated Tim Boven, recycling commercial director at Dow. “We are looking forward to learning more about NuPlastiQ, and hope the collaboration will help us determine how these product combinations can benefit the market needs for the future.”
    Dow’s commitment and mission to deliver breakthrough sustainable chemistry innovations that advance the well-being of humanity directly aligns with BioLogiQ’s goal of discovering more sustainable solutions to plastics.

    “Our mission at BioLogiQ is to provide a way to create plastic products made from renewable resources,” explained Brad LaPray, founder and president of BioLogiQ. “This evaluation will help us determine if there is an opportunity for Dow and BioLogiQ to work together in the future to offer new applications to our customers.”

    The evaluation will help determine if NuPlastiQ is a potential fit with Dow’s business from performance, bio-based and commercial viability perspectives. During the next year, Dow and BioLogiQ will perform evaluations at Dow’s Pack Studios Development Center in Freeport, Texas and engage brands, research institutes and associations to evaluate the range of benefits from a combined offering.

    https://www.biologiq.com

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