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  • K 2019: Clariant calls for collaborative sustainability

    26.06.2019

    K2019 - the world’s leading trade show for plastics and rubber – is approaching and exhibitors are starting to stir themselves. One thing is clear: the sustainability theme has once again been strongly embraced by participants across the board.

    aAs action to tackle the challenge of plastic pollution gains momentum, including a new international framework signed by G20 ministers to address marine plastic waste, specialty chemical company Clariant announces proactive steps to foster partnerships and create a more sustainable plastics industry through a “Symphony of Collaboration”.

    Whilst plastic has been described as the ‘success story of the 20th century’, its sustainability is increasingly under the spotlight. Every year, about 200-million tons are disposed of in landfills and about eight-million tons leak into our oceans. Responding to consumer-led concern around this waste, Clariant’s “Symphony of Collaboration” recognizes that regulators, industry and society have a responsibility to work more closely to drive design for, and innovation in, the reduction, reuse and recycling of plastics.

    At K 2019, Clariant will shine a light on collaborative sustainability projects and the products behind them, supporting the development of solutions that will be adopted in the market. This includes the launch of a major new company-wide initiative specifically focused on plastics’ recycling. It aims to change the current take-make-dispose consumer attitude, moving towards a circular economy for post-consumer and post-industrial plastic through three key elements: the development of product and system solutions for recycling; partnerships with players across the recycling ecosystem to draw on different perspectives and develop new solutions; achieving a vast and diverse understanding of the challenges by sharing knowledge across different recycling technologies and the value chain of recycling.

    Already, one important partnership has delivered some breakthrough results. Together with the Finnish oil refining company, Neste, which is passionate about giving fat residues and discarded cooking oils a second life, Clariant has been exploring opportunities to use renewable hydrocarbons, derived from this waste. More will be revealed at K, including new products for plastic applications based on mass-balance certification for usage of renewable polyolefins.

    With a partner for Near Infrared (NIR) scanners , Clariant developed new colorants for the black coloration of plastics that can be identified by NIR sorting devices. This new range of black colorants can be used for various polymers (e.g. Polyolefins, PET, PA) and applications such as packaging and E&E. This offers brand owners and masterbatch producers new opportunities.

    In line with making recycling a viable option, Clariant announces a support boost for effective mono-material consumer solutions. A key priority here is ensuring the attractiveness of virgin PET for packaging. At K 2019, Clariant will launch its new masterbatch for PET destined for the food and beverage market. The patented oxygen scavenger is based on a new molecule that goes beyond existing solutions for PET in protecting content shelf life and taste. It’s proving a real success in initial customer trials, offering the potential to address a number of challenges for packaging producers in one solution.

    In a further drive for collaboration, Clariant is also taking its EcoTain® label, currently awarded to a portfolio of more than 200 products that show outstanding sustainability advantages, to the next level. EcoTain is being expanded to include EcoTain Partnerships that will foster collaboration between at least three partners in the value chain to create concrete sustainability and business impacts, and advance environmental protection and the circular economy. At K 2019, Clariant will issue an open invitation to companies to come together and collaborate specifically on one particularly challenging aspect of recycling.

    Clariant’s Richard Haldimann, Head of Innovation Excellence and Business Incubator, said that the company is proud to be fostering these partnerships across the value chain, from producer to recycler: “Clariant has been providing solutions to reduce the use of plastics, extend their lifetime to enable reuse, and supporting recycling for years. But we’ve learned from experience that the wider problem can’t be solved at an individual company level. It’s a system problem and collaboration is key.”

    The Symphony of Collaboration has begun, and will continue, to open dialogs, develop and deploy projects that minimize and manage plastic waste and promote plastic post-use solutions, helping to turn brand owners’ and manufacturers’ sustainability commitments into achievable goals. Advancing plastics in these directions through dedicated cooperation is the chosen way forward. Clariant believes it will more effectively find the optimal solutions for the recycling challenge of its customers, increasing the attractiveness and functionality of post-consumer and post-industrial recyclate. And ensure additives such as flame retardants or pigments don’t stand in the way of an application’s recyclability or biodegradability or the adoption of renewable-based plastics.

    With EU, and other national plastics regulations, set to come into force within the next five years, it’s clear that collaboration, innovation and solutions to plastics waste are not only necessary, they must begin now.

    Clariant is set to reveal several further exciting collaborations and the sustainable products behind them as well as its plans for EcoTain at K 2019, October 19-23, Düsseldorf, Germany (Hall 8a Booth J11). Insights and updates are available ahead of the show at http://www.clariant.com/K2019.

  • A solution in scale

    25.06.2019

    Product design student Lucy Hughes has invented a bioplastic created from fish skin and scales and red algae which could have help to limit the amount of non-biodegradable plastic waste created in the world.

    sThe fully biodegradable and compostable material, called Marinatex, has been designed as an environmentally-responsible replacement for plastic film currently used in a whole host of packaging including sandwich boxes.

    It can biodegrade in a soil environment in less than a month and can be disposed of through ordinary food waste collections.

    Lucy, a fourth year product design undergraduate student at the University of Sussex, said: "It makes no sense to me that we are using plastic, an incredibly durable material, for products that have a lifecycle of less than a day. And I'm not alone, there is a growing community of bioplastic pioneers that are working towards finding alternatives to our dependency on plastic.
    “With Marinatex, we are transforming a waste stream into the main component of a new product. By doing so, we have created a consistent, transparent and 'plastic-like' material with a more planet-friendly and product appropriate lifecycle for packaging."

    The 23-year-old student from Twickenham developed her idea following a visit to Newhaven-based sustainable fishing company MCB Seafoods Ltd.

    Seeing first-hand the organic waste material from the fishing industry, she identified the potential in the material, in reliable and plentiful supply, which when combined with a biopolymer such as red algae created an extremely effective plastic substitute.

    Lucy said: “Algae bioplastics are becoming more common, but the issue I faced during development was that the sheets I made without the fish waste seemed to revert back into a crinkled seaweed shape. I needed to find a material that would make the formula more consistent. I challenged myself to find a material that was from a local waste stream. My initial experiments involved other types of fish waste such as mussel shells and crustacean skeletons before settling on fish waste. The result was a locally sourced sea-based solution."

    A recent study has revealed that some bioplastics, such as PLA made from fermented corn starch, have not lived up to claims of being compostable or biodegradable – remaining intact after more than three years.
    Marinatex degrades in a tiny fraction of that time, and is also cheaper to produce and does not require an entirely new recycling scheme for disposal.

    https://www.sussex.ac.uk/news


    Image: Product design student Lucy Hughes has invented a bioplastic created from fish skin and scales and red algae.

  • Vivobarefoot launches the Primus Lite ll bio shoe

    24.06.2019

    On time for summer, leading global barefoot shoe company VIVOBAREFOOT announced last month the launch of Primus Lite II Bio, the company’s most innovative sustainable shoe to date and one of the world’s first plant-based performance shoes.

    sThe brand unveiled the new unisex shoe on the heels of independent sustainability research, which highlighted eco materials as a key factor in consumer purchasing decisions. The Primus Lite II Bio went on sale on May 20.

    The new vegan shoe is designed with over 30 percent renewable plant-based materials, including Bio TPU made from yellow dent field corn, natural rubber and harvested algae called Bloom, instead of single-use petroleum materials.
    The corn-based, vegan biopolymer, a natural bi-product of the field-corn food industry called ‘Susterra Propanediol’ or ‘1,3-propanediol’,was developed by DuPont Tate & Lyle Bio Products. Susterra propanediol is a pure, bio-based, petroleum-free diol.
    Sorona, a bio-based fibre also used in the shoe is a trademark of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company.
    Bloom Foam is created by harvesting algal biomass from freshwater sources at high risk of algal bloom. Using this algae biomass cleans and restores the environment when harvested. Bloom is an ALGIX Brand.

    The award-winning design of the new shoe is the company’s lightest and most efficient and weighs on average an estimated 10 percent less than today’s standard performance shoes.

    The new generation of VIVOBAREFOOT’s Primus Lite style is a game-changer for the footwear industry and represents a major stride for the company towards its goal of using 100 percent bio-based materials in a future iteration of this product. Additional styles and colors of the Bio line will be released in Fall 2019.

    VIVOBAREFOOT’s sustainbility ethos is uniquely different from other footwear brands in the industry, as it is rooted in design, wellness and social impact, along with utilizing eco-friendly materials. The company believes product design encompasses doing more with less and creating durable products. Its focus on wellness enables people to move in a natural, healthy, connected way, while maintaining performance and durability.

    “The launch of the Primus Lite Bio represents an exciting step away from the industry’s reliance on single use petroleum-based materials and towards a promising future of plant-based alternatives,” said Asher Clark, Design Director at VIVOBAREFOOT. “We want to challenge the world’s relationship with shoes, the materials they are made from and the impact they are having on us and our environment. Our ultimate goal is complete circularity.”

    More than 20 billion pairs of shoes are made annually, most from petrochemicals, which have a harmful impact on the environment, contributing to the already serious effects of climate change. The plant-based materials in the Primus Lite II Bio shoe are sourced and managed responsibly, reducing water, energy and CO2 emissions, improving waste water and ultimately reducing their ecological footprint.

    The release of Primus Lite II Bio follows VIVOBAREFOOT’s commissioned consumer research study, which was conducted by an independent research company in April 2019. The study confirmed that most consumers today have different definitions of sustainability but a key focus for them was the use of eco-friendly materials in the products they buy. This is reassuring data for VIVOBAREFOOT, which is on a mission to phase out petrochemicals and use 100 percent sustainable materials in the next two years.

    Clark added, “The less you put between your feet and the environment, the better. Just like our other styles, Primus Lite II Bio was designed to let people’s feet do their natural thing, while providing maximum sensory feedback from your body to your brain. The Primus Lite II Bio is not perfect, it still contains significant non-plant-based products, but it’s a step in the right direction. There are many challenges the footwear industry faces in creating sustainable products, and VIVOBAREFOOT believes it is better to innovate for good, rather than to stand still.”

    http://www.vivobarefoot.com

  •  
  • K 2019: Clariant calls for collaborative sustainability

    K 2019: Clariant calls for collaborative sustainability [26-06-19]

    K2019 - the world’s leading trade show for plastics and rubber – is approaching and exhibitors are starting to stir themselves. One thing is clear: the sustainability theme has once again been strongly embraced by participants across the board. [more]

  • A solution in scale

    A solution in scale [25-06-19]

    Product design student Lucy Hughes has invented a bioplastic created from fish skin and scales and red algae which could have help to limit the amount of non-biodegradable plastic waste created in the world. [more]

  • Vivobarefoot launches the Primus Lite ll bio shoe

    Vivobarefoot launches the Primus Lite ll bio shoe  [24-06-19]

    On time for summer, leading global barefoot shoe company VIVOBAREFOOT announced last month the launch of Primus Lite II Bio, the company’s most innovative sustainable shoe to date and one of the world’s first plant-based performance shoes.  [more]

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